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TMD IS TWICE MORE COMMON IN WOMEN

TMJ TREATMENT NEAR YOU IN MISSISSAUGA
 

TMD or Temporomandibular Joint Disorder means jaw joints are not functioning as they are supposed to. As a result, you may experience jaw pain, and/or your jaw joints may make noise when you chew or speak. 

 

If you are experiencing TMJ problems, there's no need for you to suffer anymore. Seek treatment from a dentist at Dunwin Dental. TMD treatment is a general dentistry procedure that aims to relieve jaw pain and muscle tension.

WHAT IS TMJ DISORDER (TMD)?


Located where your jaw meets your skull are your Temporomandibular Joints. Your TMJs and muscles on each side of your jaw help you open and close your mouth, chew, talk, and swallow. These 2 joints move in many different directions and are among the most complex joints in the body. They work together in a delicate balance with muscles, ligaments, cartilage, and your jaw bones. When a problem prevents these parts from working together properly, pain may result.

Conditions causing pain in the joint that controls the movement of the jaw falls under “Temporomandibular Disorder” or TMD. They are twice as common in women than men.

SYMPTOMS OF TMJ DISORDER

  • A painful or tender jaw

  • Pain in the temporomandibular joint on one or both sides

  • Pain that occurs when you chew or yawn

  • Having problems chewing that don’t include pain

  • Dull, aching pain in the face

  • Difficulty closing or opening your jaw due to the joint locking

  • Clicking or popping noises in your jaw

  • Pain in or around your ear

  • Frequent headaches

  • Difficulty opening or closing your mouth or your jaw strays when you open your mouth.

 

If you have one or more of the symptoms listed above, you should contact us to schedule an appointment with your dentist for evaluation.

WHAT ARE THE ROOT CAUSES OF TMD?

  • Injuries to the jaw

  • Genetics

  • Arthritis

  • Bruxism

TMJ DISORDER TREATMENTS

TMJ management or treatment depends on the severity of the disorder. Many people have symptoms of a TMJ disorder and are still able to fully function in their daily lives. For some patients the disorder may disappear by itself, for others, it may worsen over time.

The first thing we’re going to do is listen to the joint while you open and close your mouth.

Oral Tests

 

We’ll also do tests to determine your jaw’s range of motion and apply pressure to sites around the jaw that cause discomfort or pain. The different types of tests include:

  • CT Scans

  • MRI’s

  • X-rays

  • TMJ Orthoscopy (inserting a camera through a thin tube known as a cannula to determine the cause of your symptoms.)

Prescription Medications

 

There are several over-the-counter and prescription medications that are helpful in treating some TMJ disorders, such as:

  •  Muscle relaxants

  • Anti-inflammatory drugs

“Less Is Often Best” Approach

 

  • Eating softer foods or avoiding foods that cause symptoms

  • Minimizing extreme jaw movements, such as yawning, yelling, or singing

  • Avoiding chewing gum

  • Reducing the pain with heat or ice packs

  • Practicing relaxation techniques to control jaw tension, such as meditation

  • Exercises to strengthen jaw muscles

  • Medicines to reduce pain or inflammation, or to help you relax

  • A night guard or bite plate to decrease clenching or grinding your teeth

  • Fixing an uneven bite by adjusting or reshaping some teeth.

I MAY HAVE TMD. WHAT DO I DO?

If you have any of the symptoms listed above, you should contact Dunwin Dental to schedule an appointment with your dentist. ​​​​Your dentist will conduct a complete evaluation. She may:

  • Check your jaw joints and muscles for tenderness, clicking, popping, or difficulty moving.

  • Review you complete medical history.

 

  • Take X-rays and may make a model of your teeth to see how your bite fits together.

 

  • Also request specialized X-rays of your TMJ.

 

  • Discuss related conditions such as jaw or head injuries, diseases that affect the muscles or joints such as arthritis, tooth grinding or clenching, and anxiety and stress.

 

Based her on findings, your dentist will recommend a suitable treatment​. Your dentist may refer you to a physician, a specialist, a physical therapist, a psychologist or another health-care professional.

TMJ DISORDER VIDEO

 

The following video briefly explains TMD. 

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